Aquatic Diversity

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Aquatic ecosystems, especially oceans, are the planet’s largest carbon sink and play a key role in regulating the world’s climate. Aquatic ecosystems are critical to global food security. An estimated 520 million people depend on fisheries and aquaculture as a source of protein and income. Aquatic genetic resources underpin the productivity, sustainability and adaptability of all aquaculture, culture-based and capture fisheries.

An estimated 90 per cent of those who depend on fisheries for their livelihood live in the global South. Over 70 per cent of the world’s total reported catch is from developing countries. In inland waters, developing countries account for at least 95 per cent of the total catch.

Links and Resources

  • Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. (2012). Fisheries and Aquaculture and Climate Change. Retrieved from fao.org
  • Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, World Fish Center. (2008). Small Scale Capture Fisheries – A Global Overview with Emphasis on Developing Countries: A preliminary report of the Big Numbers Project. Retrieved from worldfishcenter.org
  • Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. (2011, May). Climate Change And Aquatic Genetic Resources For Food And Agriculture: State Of Knowledge, Risks And Opportunities. Retrieved from fao.org

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